MagicTime

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BASICS

a match

two teams playing against each other in a 90-minute game of football

a pitch

the area where footballers play a match

a referee

the person who makes sure that the players follow the rules. Normally wears a black shirt and shorts, and has a whistle

a linesman (referee's assistant)

the person whose main duty it is to indicate with a flag when the ball has gone out of play or when a player is offside

a goalkeeper

the player in goal who has to stop the ball from crossing the goal-line. The only player who is allowed to handle the ball during open play

a defender

a player who plays in the part of the football team which tries to prevent the other team from scoring goals, e.g. 'Kolo Touré is a defender and plays in defence for Arsenal and Ivory Coast'.

a midfielder

a midfielder – a player who plays mainly in the middle part of the pitch (or midfield), e.g. Michael Essien is a midfielder and plays in midfield for Chelsea and Ghana

an attacker

also called a forward; a player whose duty it is to score goals, e.g. Samuel Eto’o is an attacker and plays in attack for Barcelona and Cameroon

a skipper

the player who leads a team, also called the captain

a substitute

a player who sits on the bench ready to replace another team-mate on the pitch. Can also be used as a verb, e.g. the manager was not happy with his attacker and substituted him after 60 minutes

a manager

the person in charge of a team and responsible for training, new players and transfers. For example, Alex Ferguson is the manager of Manchester United

a foul

a violation of the rules. For example, if a player other than the goalkeeper handles the ball in the penalty box (or penalty area) it is a foul and a penalty is given to the other team

a booking

a yellow card shown to a player by the referee for a serious foul. Two bookings or yellow cards result in a red card or sending-off

full-time

the point of the game when the referee blows the final whistle and the match is over. Normally after 90 minutes and any added injury or stoppage time

injury time

also called stoppage time, added minutes at the end of the regular playing time at half-time or full-time. Entirely at the referee’s discretion and normally indicated by an official on the sideline (or touchline)

extra time

if a match has no winner at full-time, 2 x 15 minutes of extra time may be played in some competitions

offside

in a position which is not allowed by the rules of the game, i.e. when an attacking player is closer to the opposing team’s goal-line at the moment the ball is passed to him or her than the last defender apart from the goalkeeper

SCORING

the score

the record of goals that indicates who is winning. The final score is the result that decides who has won the match . Can also be used as a verb, e.g. the attacker scored a beautiful goal

 

to concede

to allow a goal in, the opposite of scoring a goal. For example, Ghana conceded only four goals in the World Cup qualifying group 2

 

a goal

a successful attempt at scoring achieved by putting the ball over the goal line into the goal past the goalkeeper. For example, Gyan Asamoah has scored a beautiful goal for Ghana

 

an own goal

a goal scored accidentally by a member of the defending team that counts in favour of the attacking team

 

the lead

when a team scores first it is “in the lead”, i.e. winning the match at the point of scoring. For example, Fabrice Akwa’s early goal gave Angola the lead after 72 minutes but the final score was 1-1 (one all)

 

an equaliser

a goal that cancels out the opposing team’s lead and leaves the match tied or drawn. Can also be used as a verb, e.g. Marouan Chamakh equalised for Morocco after 40 minutes and brought the score level

 

to win

a match in which a team is victorious and beats the other team. A win normally gives the winning team three points, the losing team does not get any points. More commonly used as a verb, e.g. Brazil won the World Cup in 2002

 

a draw

a match that ends in a tie, i.e. has no winner or loser. The teams get one point each for a draw. Can also be used as a verb, e.g. Congo drew 0-0 (nil all) with Senegal in June

 

a defeat

a match that is lost, the opposite of a win. For example, Sudan suffered a home defeat to Zambia in September 2002

 

to knock out

to eliminate another team from a competition. For example, in the last World Cup Brazil knocked out England in the quarter-finals

 

a penalty shoot-out

in a knock-out competition, a penalty shoot-out takes place if a match is a draw after full-time or extra-time. Five players from each team take a penalty each, and if the score is still level after that, one player from each team takes a penalty in turn, in order to decide who wins the match

 

a goal difference

If team A has scored four goals and team B one, the goal difference is three

 

a head-to-head

a way of deciding which team is ranked higher if two teams are level (or equal) on points. For example, if team A and B both have six points, but team A beat team B in the head-to-head game, team A will be ranked above team B

 

a play-off

an extra match to decide which of two or more teams should go through to the next round. For example, Australia beat Uruguay on penalties in a play-off to qualify for the World Cup 2006

 

the away-goal rule

in some competitions, e.g. the UEFA Champions’ League, a rule that rewards teams for scoring away from home over two legs (or matches). For example, in 2005 AC Milan beat PSV Eindhoven 2-0 at home (in Milan) but lost 1-3 away in Holland. So both teams had scored three goals and conceded three goals, but because AC Milan had scored a goal away from home it went through to the Champions’ League final on the away-goal rule


نوشته شده در Wed 10 Apr 2013ساعت 9:4 AM توسط Unknown| |


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